Sullivan & Company Real Estate, LLC | Brimfield Real Estate, Sturbridge Real Estate

Contingencies are a great resource when it comes to both buying and selling a home. Both buyers and sellers tend to ask for certain contingencies to be included in the purchase contracts for a home. These contracts have a time limit on them to give both buyers and sellers time to get the things that the contracts state done. This time frame is usually somewhere in the neighborhood of several weeks’ time between the signing of the sales contract and the closing of the deal on the home.

Meeting And Removing Contingencies

During the time that you have between the sales agreement and the closing of the home, you’ll be working to either meet the contingencies or trying to have them removed. This can be done through renegotiating or having work orders completed. In some cases at this point the entire purchase may be called off.  

Standard Or Not?

Some contingencies are very common and it would be a bad choice to reject them. Buyer’s inspection contingencies, for example, are quite common. In this case, closing is subject to the approval of an inspection report. If a buyer really loves a property and is in the “desperate” category, they’ll often end up waiving this and take the home as is. Your realtor and attorney will be able to inform you of what types of contingencies are the norm. 

Some of the things that buyers and sellers see on these contracts are a little out of the ordinary or are less convenient. They become a matter of negotiation. Some sellers may ask that the deal is contingent upon them closing on another home. If you need a home in a hurry, you may want to reject this and request a time limit. As a buyer, you always risk failing to reach a contract with your seller when you ask for these changes. Anything that you’re able to handle in a contract is worth it if you really love the house, but there’s a balance. As a buyer, you can do the same, requesting a contingency that you sell your house before the new home is purchased. 


Most standard home purchase contracts include a contingency that the buyer is able to secure financing to buy the home. There’s also a time frame for the intended financing to be secured. The only way to skip these contingencies is to have an all cash offer, which is pretty rare! 

Other contingencies that are almost a must include the inspection contingency and the title contingency. These protect the buyer in order to be sure that the home has a clean title and no major damage. These allow buyers to back out of a buying a home if there is more work to it than they thought. The title contingency also protects renters or squatters from selling a home that they do not own.